` Representative Pat Haddad
State Representative
Patricia A. Haddad

News
Masters, commanders — 450 graduate from Bridgewater State
By Enterprise Staff BRIDGEWATER – Bridgewater State University graduated over 450 students with advanced degrees Thursday evening, while state Rep. Patricia Haddad delivered the keynote address. The ceremony was held on the quadrangle in front of Boyden Hall. Besides Haddad, the event also featured a speech by Angelica R. Moore, who earned a master’s degree […]

BRIDGEWATER – Bridgewater State University graduated over 450 students with advanced degrees Thursday evening, while state Rep. Patricia Haddad delivered the keynote address.

The ceremony was held on the quadrangle in front of Boyden Hall. Besides Haddad, the event also featured a speech by Angelica R. Moore, who earned a master’s degree in social work.

Haddad, a 1972 BSU graduate, received an honorary degree.

The university’s Distinguished Service Award went to James and Theresa Orcutt, the founders of My Brother’s Keeper of Easton/Brockton and Dartmouth. The organization is a Christian ministry that delivers furniture and food to families in need.


Veteran’s Memorial Bridge Westbound Detour Scheduled for Saturday, March 25
The Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT) announced today that the Route 6 westbound roadway on the Veteran’s Memorial Bridge (over the Taunton River) between Fall River and Somerset will be temporarily closed to vehicular traffic on Saturday, March 25.   The closure will begin at 5:00 AM and last until approximately 11:00 AM.  The closure […]

The Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT) announced today that the Route 6 westbound roadway on the Veteran’s Memorial Bridge (over the Taunton River) between Fall River and Somerset will be temporarily closed to vehicular traffic on Saturday, March 25.

 

The closure will begin at 5:00 AM and last until approximately 11:00 AM.  The closure is necessary to replace the damaged traffic barrier gate.

 

A detour, with full signage, will be in place to aid vehicles in traveling from Fall River into Somerset via I-195 and the Braga Bridge.  Traffic traveling on Route 6 eastbound will not be effected.

 

The temporary detour will be in place for all motor vehicle traffic as follows:

Traveling North on North Davol Street:

 

  • Travel north on North Davol Street to Route 79/138 South (Tiverton RI)
  • Continue south on Route 79/138 South (Tiverton RI)
  • Follow Route 6 Detour signage to I-195 Westbound, traveling over the Braga Bridge
  • Take Exit 4B – Route 103 East/ Somerset
  • Take a right at the end of the ramp onto Wilbur Avenue
  • Follow Wilbur Aveune (Route 103) to Brayton Avenue
  • Follow Brayton Avenue to Route 6

 

Traveling North on Route 79:

 

  • Travel north on Route 79 North
  • Bear right to Route 6 East/North Davol Street
  • Travel north on North Davol Street to Route 79/138 South (Tiverton RI)
  • Continue south on Route 79/138 South (Tiverton RI)
  • Follow Route 6 detour signage to I-195 Westbound, traveling over the Braga Bridge
  • Take Exit 4B – Route 103 East/ Somerset
  • Take a right at the end of the ramp onto Wilbur Avenue
  • Follow Wilbur Aveune (Route 103) to Brayton Avenue
  • Follow Brayton Avenue to Route 6

 

Traveling South on South Davol Street:

 

  • Travel south on South Davol Street
  • Follow Route 6 detour signage to I-195 Westbound, traveling over the Braga Bridge
  • Take Exit 4B – Route 103 East/ Somerset
  • Take a right at the end of the ramp onto Wilbur Avenue
  • Follow Wilbur Aveune (Route 103) to Brayton Avenue
  • Follow Brayton Avenue to Route 6

 

Traveling South on Route 79 South:

 

  • Travel south on Route 79
  • Follow Route 6 Detour signage to I-195 Westbound, traveling over the Braga Bridge
  • Take Exit 4B – Route 103 East/ Somerset
  • Take a right at the end of the ramp onto Wilbur Avenue
  • Follow Wilbur Aveune (Route 103) to Brayton Avenue
  • Follow Brayton Avenue to Route 6

 

 

MassDOT advises motorists to seek alternate routes between Fall River and Somerset during these times.

 

The schedule for this work is weather and emergency dependent and subject to change without notice.


AG HEALEY LAUNCHES GRANT PROGRAM TO PROMOTE EQUAL OPPORTUNITY FOR WOMEN, MINORITY WORKERS IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY
Program Will Award Total of $90,000 in Grant Funding to Eligible Applicants  BOSTON – Continuing her commitment to advance the economic opportunity of Massachusetts residents, Attorney General Maura Healey today announced a new grant program aimed at providing opportunities for women and minority workers and small business owners in the public construction industry. “The construction […]

Program Will Award Total of $90,000 in Grant Funding to Eligible Applicants 

BOSTON – Continuing her commitment to advance the economic opportunity of Massachusetts residents, Attorney General Maura Healey today announced a new grant program aimed at providing opportunities for women and minority workers and small business owners in the public construction industry.

“The construction industry provides highly-skilled and good-paying jobs that help families thrive,” said AG Healey. “This grant will help ensure that these opportunities continue to be accessible to women and minorities in our state.”

The Equal Opportunity in the Construction Trades Grant program will provide funding to projects that promote opportunity through apprenticeship programs, job trainings and diversity and inclusion trainings, and support and outreach programs. The new program is open to workers’ centers, unions, non-profit organizations, chambers of commerce, public schools, municipalities, small businesses, and post-secondary student organizations.

 

The grant program will utilize funding from a judgment the AG’s False Claims Division secured with CTA Construction Company for the purpose of promoting equal opportunity in public construction, employment or education.

 

The AG’s Office anticipates awarding a total of $90,000 to multiple grantees. The funding will be awarded to recipients in two ranges:

 

  • One or more grants of up to $40,000 will be awarded to eligible unions, municipalities, schools, small businesses, nonprofit organizations and chambers of commerce to provide education, training and technical skills to workers interested in careers in the construction industry and;
  • One or more micro-grants of up to $10,000 will be awarded to eligible nonprofit organizations or student organizations to fund outreach and training for women and minority workers to join the construction industry.

 

Special consideration will be given to applicants who can demonstrate the grant will be used to promote equal opportunity within underrepresented populations including veterans.

 

This is a one-year grant program that will start on June 1, 2017 and end on May 31, 2018. Interested applicants can visit the AG’s website, www.mass.gov/ago/grants for more information and for application instructions. Applications must be received by 4 p.m. on Friday, March 31, 2017.


Fall River area women rally for social justice in Boston Women’s March
“Equality is the battle cry,” said Haddad. “We’re not here to protest. We’re here to be positive.” By Michael Holtzman Herald News Staff Reporter Huge crowds overflowing the Boston Common from one end to the other, tons of excitement and music and “a lot of positive energy” was how state Rep. Patricia Haddad, D-Somerset, described […]

“Equality is the battle cry,” said Haddad. “We’re not here to protest. We’re here to be positive.”

Huge crowds overflowing the Boston Common from one end to the other, tons of excitement and music and “a lot of positive energy” was how state Rep. Patricia Haddad, D-Somerset, described early stages of the women’s march in Boston.

After listening to Massachusetts’ two Democratic senators, Elizabeth Warren and Edward Markey, Haddad said the message she heard from them on day two of Donald Trump’s presidency was the same: “Be vigilant.”

“Equality is the battle cry,” said Haddad, 66, a 16-year legislator and House leader, noting this year celebrates the 100th year of women’s suffrage.

“We’re not here to protest. We’re here to be positive,” she emphasized several times.

Sally Cameron, who this fall retired after a 31-year career as Bristol Community College director of public affairs in Fall River, noted the anti-Trump signs at the national march in Washington, D.C., but said that was not the prime message there.

It was “anti-going backwards.”

As a white woman of privilege, who was too young to experience the Civil Rights and women’s rights movement struggles, Cameron said, the hostile rhetoric Trump’s exhibited caused her concern and brought her to Washington.

“I just think we can’t go backwards,” said Cameron, 61, of Carver.

Haddad, in a message during the lengthy speakers program that delayed the Boston march more than an hour, remarked immediately about the crowd dwarfing the 80,000 predicted. She said the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation was estimating it was approximately 120,000, while there were TV reports putting the number as high as 175,000, she said.

It made Boston’s women’s march the second-largest in the country after Washington, D.C., where an estimated 500,000 people hit the streets.

“There was just a lot of positive energy,” Haddad said. “It was really a very uplifting day.”

By that Haddad said while the marchers were gathered “for our personal reasons” her own most personal ones could be construed as universal.

With four grandchildren – three girls and a boy – Haddad wants them to be able to attend college “without crushing debt,” and for their lives to demonstrate that “people have a choice.”

That would mean over who they wish to marry, control of their bodies and having affordable health care, she said as examples. She said many were there to show support for preserving the environment, for women’s health, to prevent domestic violence.

Haddad took a bus from Fall River and New Bedford with more than a dozen friends to Boston. She estimated about half the House Democrats attended the march.

“We’re not marching against anything. … People want to be involved,” said the former physical education teacher for the Somerset school system.

Erica Scott-Pacheco of Fall River, with her mother, Nancy Scott of Rehoboth, and two close friends, said, “We are humbled to be here and listen to the inspirational speakers uniting our community and nation. It is a good day to be a woman!” said the 32-year-old, who works as director of development for South Coastal Counties Legal Services.

Of the march itself, she said, “It has been extremely peaceful and positive especially considering the amount of people. None of us have ever seen so many people in one place, yet everyone is very polite.”

A college student at Harvard in 2004 when the Red Sox broke their 86-year curse and won the World Series, Scott-Pacheco fondly remembered that celebration and parade in Boston. “There definitely were more people here today,” she said.

More Video: Sabrina Davis reads from a prepared statement in protest of Donald Trump.

The crowd figure she heard repeated was 125,000.

Scott-Pacheco continued, “It has been an educational experience with every possible social issue represented by the signs and speakers. Men and women are about equally represented from every walk of life, from children to elders.”

She and her friends Nadia Rebello and Amy Blanchette of Fall River held colorful signs proclaiming, “Fall River marches for social justice” with the tag line #WhyWeMarch. “My idea was to represent Fall River and the SouthCoast,” she said, proud that others with Fall River ties came up to them.

Her group drove from Fall River to Boston and got there at 9 a.m. for the speaking program scheduled to start at 11. “There was actually no traffic,” she said.

In another photo she shared showing the close likeness of daughter and mother, both smiling broadly in the massive crowd, the mother held up a sign “Honor the Treaties” while Scott-Pacheco’s said, “We the Resilient” next to a woman’s fist.

Scott-Pacheco said one speech that encouraged her most was Attorney General Maura Healey telling the massive crowd she’d stand up to the Trump administration on rolling back essential gains like health care, gay marriage and women’s rights to choose over their pregnancies.

“She would sue the administration for all of us,” Scott-Pacheco repeated, saying it made her hopeful because Massachusetts has been a leader in those areas.

The women’s march was united believing “we don’t want to roll back any social justice progress that we’ve made,” Scott-Pacheco said.

Blanchette, 33, a full-time student at Bristol Community College in Fall River, where she also works, and whose goal is to obtain her Ph.D. and return to BCC to teach English, was also representing a higher education nonprofit called PHENOM.

Blanchette said she and Scott-Pacheco are “both social justice warriors” and as such, “it was just an amazing feeling of 100,000 plus people marching – women, children, all races and sexual orientations, people with disabilities, people in wheelchairs – it was such an empowering and emotional day,” she said. “I was just shocked how many people turned out.”

Also encouraging Blanchette were the news cameras and helicopters everywhere and “people who live along Boston Commons cheering us with their signs and art work. It was just such a sense of camaraderie.”

Rebello, 39, a nurse case manager for a large medical company, is a Girl Scout leader (GSSNE Troop 1002) and the mother of three girls – 5-year-old twins and a 9-year-old.

“She knew I was going to Boston to March,” Rebello said of her oldest daughter, Isabella, whom she called “a huge Hillary supporter.” She added, “I will talk with them later tonight” about the experience.

Rebello described “a sea of people that showed up for many causes. It was extremely peaceful, no rioting, people of all age backgrounds, colors and races came for the same cause of preserving rights.

“Today made a great difference,” she said hopefully.

In concluding, Scott-Pacheco said she did not see President Trump as the prime focus. “Maybe 20 percent,” she said, but his presidency “absolutely” is what brought them together to affirm social justice and human rights, she said.

She laughed at the creative displays to parody Trump for his threatening and offensive behavior. Loads of people were wearing “pink pussy hats” because of the obvious tie-in. “There were a lot of even elderly women, men and children in little pussy hats. Infants in baby carriages were wearing them,” she said.

Scott-Pacheco concluded: “Monday I go back to my job and just keep working to defend elders and low income in our community. I think now more than ever people going to need the help.”

Email Michael Holtzman at mholtzman@heraldnews.com or call him at 508-676-2573.


2016 SouthCoast Woman of the Year: Patricia Haddad saw ‘a need to get something done’
By Mike Lawrence As veteran state Rep. Patricia Haddad walked up steep, narrow, metal steps to the roof of the old Standard-Times building in downtown New Bedford, she couldn’t help comparing the situation to getting offshore wind into the state’s new energy bill. “This is a major uphill climb,” joked Haddad, 66, recalling legislative hurdles […]

As veteran state Rep. Patricia Haddad walked up steep, narrow, metal steps to the roof of the old Standard-Times building in downtown New Bedford, she couldn’t help comparing the situation to getting offshore wind into the state’s new energy bill.

“This is a major uphill climb,” joked Haddad, 66, recalling legislative hurdles while gamely ascending the dusty staircase in high heels, a dress and a large overcoat.

But just like it did on Beacon Hill, Haddad’s willingness to climb through grime paid off, as she emerged onto the roof and into the sunshine for a photo shoot with Matthew Morrissey. The photos on a brisk December day commemorated their selection as The Standard-Times’ SouthCoast Woman and Man of the Year for 2016.

Haddad, a Somerset Democrat and former teacher, recently completed her 16th year in the state’s House of Representatives, where she holds the leadership position of speaker pro tempore. That position, her tireless energy and relentless salesmanship helped her play a leading role in getting offshore wind off the ground.

After climbing back down the stairs and into the warmer confines of Morrissey’s office, she said it was “a little embarrassing” to receive the newspaper’s recognition for work that she viewed simply as an effort to help the region.

“You go forward to do things that you know are going to help people. There’s no expectation for recognition – there’s a need to get something done,” Haddad said. “To be recognized for something that is part of my job, part of what I try to do every day …; It’s really a little embarrassing, because I just feel like I just want to do my work and sort of stay in the background and get it done.

“It’s such an honor that people are saying, ‘Yes, this is really going to change people’s lives,'” she added.

The multi-year effort to get offshore wind into the state’s energy bill required Haddad to do anything but stay in the background. Amid pressures and lobbying on multiple fronts, as solar, hydro and onshore wind concerns also vied for places in the state’s energy future, and fossil fuel-backers opposed the bill, Haddad became a non-stop booster for offshore wind.

Democratic state Rep. Tom Golden of Lowell, for example, said Haddad gave him seven three-ring binders of research on offshore wind, to help his deliberations as chairman of the energy committee.

“You heard me right – seven,” Golden told The Standard-Times in August. “You couldn’t believe how helpful that was. She was tenacious.”

Those binders found their way into numerous offices on Beacon Hill, as Haddad made her pitch to all who would listen.

New Bedford Mayor Jon Mitchell said Haddad, “isn’t one of those people who thinks that talk is a substitute for action” – and especially not when it comes to offshore wind.

“There had to be a bigger conversation around energy, and she took the lead,” Mitchell said. “By starting a broader conversation about the Commonwealth’s energy needs, and by eliciting the input of a broader array of stakeholders, including the utilities, she gained a lot of credibility for the bill that she ultimately filed.”

Mitchell added that Haddad, “works effectively because she has the discipline to check her ego – not everybody in public life can do that well.”

Morrissey said that, “Without Pat, there’s no question that the (energy bill) would not have passed.”

He then added a quick joke.

“We’re going to name the first turbine after her.”


Somerset secures more funds to offset lost power plant tax revenues
By Herald News staff SOMERSET – The town will continue to receive state funding to help offset tax revenues lost from the closing of power plants. State Sen. Michael Rodrigues and state Rep. Patricia Haddad announced Wednesday that $634,023 has been secured to help offset lost tax revenue from the closed Montaup Power Plant. The […]

SOMERSET – The town will continue to receive state funding to help offset tax revenues lost from the closing of power plants.

State Sen. Michael Rodrigues and state Rep. Patricia Haddad announced Wednesday that $634,023 has been secured to help offset lost tax revenue from the closed Montaup Power Plant. The funding is from the state Department of Energy Resources’ Regional Greenhouse Gas initiative.

“Since 2013, Representative Haddad and I have worked to secure almost $10 million in financial assistance from the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) to help reduce the financial burden placed upon Somerset’s taxpayers,” Rodrigues said in a press release. “We will continue to make the Somerset’s economic well-being a top priority to stabilize and improve the town’s finances.”

The funding comes as town leaders announced in September that the Department of Revenue certified $6,396,907 that would be available for the town to use toward taxation when the tax rate is set. Included in that amount is $3.6 million from RGGI funds to offset power plant tax losses. Of that amoung, $3 million, was from Brayton Point tax losses and the $600,000 from the long-closed former Montaup power plant.

“Our continued diligence in securing funds to offset Somerset’s reduced tax revenues due to power plant power-downs is evidenced once again by this allocation,” Haddad said in a statement. “The senator and I intend to continue our work in securing regional greenhouse funding as we work with the selectmen in securing new businesses to help assume the lost tax revenues.”

A portion of the former Montaup site has recently been used to store vehicles that are being shipped to countries in the Caribbean. The site was purchased in March 2014 for $2.55 million by William Thibeault. He has since sold just less than 11 acres to National Grid for the utility to rebuild and modernize its transformer substation network.

Montaup was retired as a power plant in 2010.

“Somerset has long been a home to the generation of electrical power that has served to meet the needs of the state and the region and has relied on the revenues generated to help provide services to the community. The allocation of RGGI funds will assist us as we look for alternative sources of revenue and maintain the level of quality services that our residents expect from the town,” Somerset Town Administrator Richard Brown said in the statement. “Representative Haddad and Senator Rodrigues have led the way in pursuing alternatives to the town’s existing power stations and developing sustainable sources of revenue for the town.”


UMass School of Law Earns Full ABA Accreditation
Commonwealth’s public law school building momentum to diversify the legal profession and expand access to justice for citizens   DARTMOUTH, MA – The UMass School of Law has earned full accreditation by the American Bar Association (ABA), a major milestone for the Commonwealth’s public law school. A letter received this morning from the ABA stated […]

Commonwealth’s public law school building momentum to diversify the legal profession and expand access to justice for citizens

 

DARTMOUTH, MA – The UMass School of Law has earned full accreditation by the American Bar Association (ABA), a major milestone for the Commonwealth’s public law school. A letter received this morning from the ABA stated that UMass Law “has demonstrated that it is in full compliance with each of the Standards.”

The law school, located at UMass Dartmouth, was established by unanimous vote of the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education in 2010 after the Southern New England School of Law donated all of its assets, including its 75,000 square foot building and 8.5-acre property, to the university. The donation was valued at $23 million.

The school earned provisional ABA accreditation on schedule in 2012. Full accreditation, the final step in the national accreditation process, means that the school has met or exceeded all ABA quality standards.

“Full ABA accreditation of the UMass School of Law means that Massachusetts now offers its residents a public, in-state legal-education option that is nationally accredited,” UMass President Marty Meehan said. “From the moment it entered the UMass system in 2010, UMass Law has had an essential focus on social justice, public service and helping the most vulnerable members of our society. For those of us concerned about protecting the rights of all residents of the Commonwealth, UMass Law will play a key role in that effort moving forward.”

“This is a landmark day for UMass Dartmouth,the UMass Law School, and the SouthCoast region,” UMass Dartmouth interim Chancellor Peyton R. Helm said. “We are fortunate to have in Marty Meehan a president who has been a strong advocate throughout the accreditation process. I also want to the faculty, staff, and students who personify the school’s mission of quality and service every day.”

“The presence of a fully accredited law school enhances the academic offerings of not just UMass Dartmouth, but of the entire public higher education system in Massachusetts,” Dr. Helm added. “The home of Adams, Hancock, Brandeis, Douglass, and so many others who have worked to bend the moral arc of the universe toward justice can now claim full membership in the national community of legal education.”

“I am so proud of the UMass Law faculty, students and staff for achieving this recognition,” School of Law Dean Eric Mitnick said. “UMass Law is uniquely situated as the first and only public law school in the Commonwealth. We recently entered the most diverse first-year class in all of New England, while at the same time strengthening our admissions statistics and bar pass outcomes. UMass Law demonstrates it is possible to offer a high quality legal education at an affordable price while serving a critical social justice mission.”

“As president, Marty Meehan has championed the cause of UMass Law with boundless energy and unshakeable commitment. In our quest to win full accreditation, we were required to make our case before the American Bar Association’s accreditation committee and the ABA Council. In both instances, President Meehan stood shoulder to shoulder with us, stressing the importance of social justice, as well as the university’s total commitment to UMass Law,” Dean Mitnick added.

“This is wonderful news,” said Student Bar Association President Mary McBride, a second year law student from Bridgewater. “If you talk to any student, you will learn that we are all proud to be here. The community of this school is so tight-knot and supportive. The public interest ethic of this school is really what draws us here, and this recognition by the ABA advances that mission.”

Since its establishment in 2010, the 190-student UMass Law has seen steady improvement in the LSAT scores and GPAs of incoming students and its bar pass rate of graduates to levels similar to other law schools in Massachusetts. UMass Law’s 25th percentile LSAT is already higher than 40 out of the 205 ABA law schools in the country.

Meanwhile, UMass Law has established a leadership position in creating legal education opportunity by recruiting one of the most diverse student bodies in the country and holding the line on student charges.  UMass Law had the most diverse entering class in New England in 2015 (35.5%) and the rate is 33% this year.

In-state tuition is now $26,466, about half the cost of private law schools. UMass Law graduates average debt load is lower than that of 115 of the 182 ABA law schools that reported debt load.

UMass Law students– in keeping with UMass Dartmouth’s nationally recognized commitment to civic engagement – have generated more than 87,000 hours of service (valued at more than $4.5 million) for the community through pro bono legal assistance, public interest law fellowships, and other programs. The school is one of the first in the country to make pro bono and experiential learning service a graduation requirement.

The school’s Public Interest Fellowship Program, which provides a 50% scholarship to students who commit to practice public interest law upon graduation, has placed students in dozens of civic, government and non-profit organizations across the region, including:

  • Committee for Public Counsel Services
  • MA Department of Children and Families
  • Fair Employment Project
  • New Bedford, Taunton, and Fall River city halls
  • Buzzards Bay Coalition
  • District Attorney offices in Bristol County, Essex County, Middlesex County
  • Beacon Hospice
  • Children’s Advocacy Center

The school is also confronting the well-documented challenge of large numbers of Massachusetts citizens going to court in civil cases without legal representation. The school established Justice Bridge, a legal practice incubator in Boston and New Bedford, to provide low-cost legal assistance to low-income people. Justice Bridge has processed more than 3,500 cases in its two years of existence. The lessons learned from the incubator will be used to guide the development of a new legal practice business model and the curriculum of UMass Law.

The law school faculty has also been making a significant contribution to legal scholarship:

  • Professor Jeremiah Ho’s proposals related to opioid screening for expectant mothers will be published in the Harvard Journal on Legislation.
  • Professor Hillary Farber has written and presented on state and national regulations related to drones.
  • Professor Margaret Drew has been recognized for her expertise in laws related to domestic violence.
  • Professor Jason Potter Burda’s HIV prevention scholarship has appeared in the Journal of the International AIDS Society.

The school has achieved ABA accreditation during a period of declining law school enrollment nationwide but unlike many schools has seen stable enrollments in recent years. With ABA accreditation, the school expects to grow enrollment over the next several years to build a budget surplus. “With national accreditation, we expect enrollment to grow in the coming years, which will strengthen our financial bottom line, and allow us to keep investing in quality,” Mitnick said. “We’re just getting started.”

News of the ABA accreditation was met with congratulations from many sectors of the community:

“Today marks a significant milestone for this school as well as the entire Southcoast community,” said Senate Assistant Majority Leader Mark Montigny, who helped lead Senate efforts to secure the creation of the Commonwealth’s only public law school.  “Since its inception, these students have provided well over 87,000 hours of pro bono work, valued at $4.5 million.  This impact cannot be overstated, and so today I congratulate the UMass Law family.”

“As a graduate of UMass Law, SouthCoast attorney, legislator, and former Bristol County prosecutor, I am gratified that our law school has been recognized for its quality and its unyielding pursuit of justice,” said state Rep. Christopher Markey, D-Dartmouth.

“The ABA’s recognition of UMass Law’s quality is evidence of what we know from our first-hand experience with the students and graduates who have worked in our office,” said Bristol County District Attorney Tom Quinn. “UMass Law prepares lawyers with the skills, ethics and desire to serve the public interest.”


Swansea kicks off 350th anniversary celebration Sunday with holiday festival
By Michael Holtzman Herald News Staff Reporter SWANSEA — Mark your calendars for “Holiday in the Village” because every season of cheer, song and merriment does not celebrate an anniversary. But this one does, and Dec. 4 from 5 to 8 p.m., beginning at Joseph Case Junior High School next to the stone steps of […]

SWANSEA — Mark your calendars for “Holiday in the Village” because every season of cheer, song and merriment does not celebrate an anniversary.

But this one does, and Dec. 4 from 5 to 8 p.m., beginning at Joseph Case Junior High School next to the stone steps of the beautified Swansea Dam, will be the official kickoff of a yearlong celebration of the town’s 350th anniversary, said Debra O’Melia, the anniversary chairwoman.

Signs are already up along Main Street saying the road from that point to just beyond Christ Church will be blocked off from 4 to 8 p.m. for the celebration.

Colorful flyers around town and on the municipal website are hailing a Toys for Tots partnership with Cardi’s Furniture, asking town residents and their families to bring an unwrapped toy to drop off at the VFW Hall on Main Street.

Bob Flynn, of the American Legion Post 303, is working with the town Boy Scouts to coordinate the drive and bring the toys to Cardi’s.

O’Melia said the celebration in just over a week will begin with a tree lighting and a speaking program of town officials at the junior high and the school department is arranging for one of its band to play before proceeding down Main Street.

Fire Station 1 next to Case will offer refreshments like cider and hot chocolate, crafts tables and Santa traveling from up North on a town fire engine, of course. Across the street, the VFW is the site for the toy dropoff for the Toys for Tots drive spearheaded by the U.S. Marines each year.

Caroling will continue at the various buildings and down Main Street.

With selectmen recently appointing a half-dozen new members to the 350th anniversary committee, both Town Administrator John McAuliffe and O’Melia said this holiday kickoff has been a group effort.

A smaller event related to the anniversary was held Oct. 30 to celebrate Founder’s Day with hiking and sharing of historic information about the town. “This we’re considering our kick-off event,” O’Melia said.

“My goal is to make this a community-based event,” she said, stating that citizens young, old and in between are welcome to attend meetings or pitch in with any ideas they have.

The committee vice chairwoman is Carol Gafford, an assistant at the public library on Main Street.

The holiday festival plans include a story hour at the library and reading of “’Twas the Night Before Christmas,” and the night will continue with more refreshments, caroling and activities at Christ Church at 57 Main St.

Email Michael Holtzman at mholtzman@heraldnews.com or call him at 508-676-2573.


SEED Corporation and Rockland Trust present FREE Basic Entrepreneurial Workshops Fall River, MA; Wednesday, December 7, 2016
The South Eastern Economic Development (SEED) Corporation and workshop sponsor Rockland Trust Community Development Corporation will hold two basic business workshops in Fall River aimed at assisting potential and existing entrepreneurs. The free workshops are being held in cooperation with the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA), Fall River Area Chamber of Commerce, MA Small Business […]

The South Eastern Economic Development (SEED) Corporation and workshop sponsor Rockland Trust Community Development Corporation will hold two basic business workshops in Fall River aimed at assisting potential and existing entrepreneurs.

The free workshops are being held in cooperation with the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA), Fall River Area Chamber of Commerce, MA Small Business Development Center (MSBDC), Fall River Office of Economic Development (FROED), Veterans Business Outreach Center (VBOC), and SCORE.

Both workshops will be held at the Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship, 151 Martine Street, Fall River, on Wednesday, December 7, 2016. 

Session I

“Learn the Fundamentals in Planning, Preparing, and Financing Your Business,” 9:00 a.m. to Noon.  Registration begins at 8:30 a.m.  Breakfast will be provided free of charge to attendees. 

This workshop is geared toward helping potential entrepreneurs evaluate and understand the fundamentals of owning one’s own business.  Information on how to get started, where and how to get financing and the loan application process will be presented.  Attendees will also be provided with a free guide to writing a business plan and other materials.

Session I

“Understanding the Purpose of Financial Statements and How They Can Help Determine the Health of Your Business” will be held from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Lunch will be provided free of charge to attendees. 

The focus of this workshop is to help attendees understand a balance sheet, income statement, and cash flow statement. The workshop also explains how a small business owner can anticipate financial needs in order to operate his/her business more efficiently.

Please call SEED Corporation at 508-822-1020 ext. 318, to register for either or both sessions by Wednesday, November 30th, and for directions to the Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship.  SEED Corporation holds this entrepreneurial workshop series on a monthly basis throughout the region.  For information on future sessions, please contact SEED.

SEED Corporation is a non-profit organization certified by the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) and designated as an Intermediary under the SBA’s Microloan Program.  This program is designed to provide loans to new and existing business owners in amounts up to $50,000.

As a regional economic development organization, SEED also offers a full range

of financing programs providing loans up to $5.5 million to assist small businesses to grow and create jobs in Massachusetts and Rhode Island.  SEED works with other economic development and financing institutions throughout the region to ensure that individuals who are committed to owning and operating a small business in the region are able to get the assistance they need to be successful.

For more information on SEED and its programs, please call the SEED office

at 508-822-1020 or visit SEED’s website at http://www.seedcorp.com.

Independent Bank Corp. has approximately $7.8 billion in assets and is the holding company for Rockland Trust Company, a full-service commercial bank headquartered in Massachusetts. Rockland Trust offers a wide range of banking, investment, and insurance services to businesses and individuals through retail branches, commercial lending offices, investment management offices, and residential lending centers in Eastern Massachusetts and Rhode Island as well as through telephone banking, mobile banking, and the Internet. Rockland Trust is an FDIC member and an Equal Housing Lender. To learn why Rockland Trust is the bank “Where Each Relationship Matters®,” please visit http://www.rocklandtrust.com.

# # #


All-in for offshore wind
By Derrick Z. Jackson   May 24, 2016 These two words should guide Beacon Hill on offshore wind: Go big. A House energy committee Monday unveiled a bill that would require utilities to purchase 1,200 megawatts of offshore wind, along with 1,200 megawatts of hydroelectric power. On the surface, that is a miracle for offshore […]

These two words should guide Beacon Hill on offshore wind:

Go big.

A House energy committee Monday unveiled a bill that would require utilities to purchase 1,200 megawatts of offshore wind, along with 1,200 megawatts of hydroelectric power. On the surface, that is a miracle for offshore wind, a year and a half after Cape Wind was crushed by opponents.

But the case for renewables in Massachusetts is more urgent than ever. The final bill should up the ante and provide for 2,000 megawatts of offshore wind — the level proposed by Representative Patricia Haddad of Somerset last year.

There are many reasons that Massachusetts should go big. The first is that the concerns about costs, voiced by offshore skeptics as well as Governor Charlie Baker, are much diminished. Europe now has more than 3,200 turbines spinning on the other side of the Atlantic. Danish, German, and British developers say costs for offshore wind should be equal to costs of fossil fuels in seven to 10 years, in part because of a steady flow of projects and an efficient supply chain.

Factoring in economic and social benefits of a surging industry, top turbine supplier Siemens calculates that, by 2025, offshore wind will be cheaper in Germany than any major fuel source, except for onshore wind. Benefits could include more jobs, less carbon, and energy that is ultimately cheaper for society than nuclear or conventional sources.

That will be true here, too, if the Legislature and Baker go for 2,000 megawatts. A recent study by the University of Delaware’s Special Initiative on Offshore Wind found that that amount, the equivalent of four Cape Winds, would create a European-style pipeline of competitively priced projects that would bring the cost of electricity down to or below today’s electricity prices by 2030. That is without federal or state tax credits and renewable energy credits.

Marc Pacheco, the Senate’s chairman on climate change, said those prospects make a 2,000 megawatt provision “a minimum of what we should be talking about.” Despite the death of Cape Wind, some of the most committed US and European players in the offshore wind industry remain bullish on the power available farther off the coast in deeper water.

Rhode Island’s Deepwater Wind, Danish energy giant DONG, and New Jersey-based OffshoreMW, a sister venture of Germany’s WindMW, already hold leases for more than 500,000 acres of ocean off the coast. Deepwater Wind should have a pilot five-turbine project up and running off Block Island later this year.

That brings up the next reason to go big. The procurement of 1,200 megawatts, while the equivalent of two-and-a-half Cape Winds, may not offer the scale to ignite an actual Massachusetts-based industry and supply chain in struggling South Coast cities like New Bedford, as well as lower electricity costs, according to the University of Delaware’s Willett Kempton. That seems pound foolish given that DONG is preparing to build the world’s biggest wind farm in the United Kingdom, one that will be 1,200 megawatts all by itself. It will power a million British homes.

Finally, the most important reason of all: Going big on offshore wind should be mandatory, given last week’s ruling by the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court that the state is not meeting mandated greenhouse gas emissions limits and now must cut emissions “on an annual basis.”

Until the ruling, the Baker administration had called for an energy “combo platter” that includes new gas pipelines. Suddenly, the thirst for gas is obsolete, and dangerous for the environment. Besides, Attorney General Maura Healey and many analysts say pipelines are not needed at all if the state focuses on energy efficiency, expands solar and wind programs, and repairs leaks in existing gas lines.

The new combo platter may mean 1,200 megawatts of hydroelectric power from Canada. But the most winning combination of renewable energy, emissions cuts, and quality jobs for Massachusetts lies right off our shores. The Commonwealth should go all-in.